Donated a Ligozzi and reopened the Hall 38

Martedì, 17 Marzo 2015 on Venerdì, 10 Aprile 2015. Posted in Uffizi's News

New layout

Donated a Ligozzi and reopened the Hall 38
Back visible from 17 March the Hall Hermaphrodite of the Uffizi Gallery, closed since last fall to implement the new production that also includes a large painting of Ligozzi, subject of a recent donation. The reputation enjoyed by the statue of Hermaphrodite, refined roman copy of a hellenistic original imperial age of the mid-second century BC, was such that, starting from 1669, the year of his entry in the grand-ducal collections, all areas that had the honor to host it took on the company name, regardless of the importance of the masterpieces of painting who shared his construction. It does not, then, except the Hall 38 Gallery, where the Hermaphrodite, settled since the first half of the nineteenth century, is the centerpiece of an anthology of works inspired by the culture of Francesco I de' Medici, the last collector and patron. Among these works is the Allegory of Virtue by Jacopo Ligozzi, monumental canvas that just to the taste of Francesco is connected, however, being entered in the grand ducal collections just in his time, as suggested by a description of the inventory of the furnishings of the Casino Mediceo drafted in 1588. The painting was sold by 1720 and, after several steps, was bought by art dealer Jean-Luc Baroni who, in memory of his father Giancarlo, in 2014 decided to make generous gift to the Gallery for reunification to its original climate. To accommodate the Allegory of Ligozzi is propably this room, thanks to the decisive contribution of the Amici degli Uffizi. The new layout The walls of the room, which is accessed from the Shelter of Inscriptions of the Third Corridor Gallery, were painted the same crimson red connotes that the Hall of Michelangelo and those devoted to the painting of the sixteenth century, the first floor of the west of the Gallery. Around the large canvas Ligozzi (which are assigned the contiguous effigy of lady richly dressed and coiffed) are works relevant to the spirit of Francesco, of which there is a portrait, a work of florentine artist, dating back to 1570. The pendant is the portrait of Gabrielle d'Estrées with one of the sisters: lyrical example of refined sensibility and with unscrupulous École de Fontainebleau. The climate courtesan behind the french table then reveals harmonies with small Allegory of Fortune, marked by Scandinavian moods also welcome to the prince; who was a lover of themes intellectually sophisticated, such as those proposed by the other small Allegory of Happiness public, painted on 1568 by Bronzino, just to Francesco. In all these works, as written, is added the sculpture of Hermaphrodite who returns to be enjoyed even by blind, as an integral part of the tactile path of the Uffizi Gallery.